Stronger Together: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Commitments

We’re working toward progress, as individuals and as a company.

We care deeply for the earth and its people. Yet, we are not whole when some lives aren’t valued. The social awakening of the past year has left our hearts heavy with the collective grief of injustice; it is time for reflection, love and meaningful action. Burt’s Bees stands together with the Black community—our employees, partners, customers, friends and neighbors—united against racism, inequality and injustice.

We know we have a responsibility to drive lasting change in our communities and within our own organization. We’ve been deeply engaged in the important work of confronting bias and creating an inclusive and diverse working environment, and we are called to further action.

Our Commitments Toward Progress

We have zero tolerance for racism.

We’re ramping up education on confronting bias and inclusive leadership through partnerships with organizations like Racial Equity Institute (REI). Our entire leadership team and one-third of our staff has completed REI Phase 1 training, and nearly all have participated in the REI Groundwater Workshop.

We are creating forums for continued listening and learning, including through our employee resource groups.

We actively seek BIPOC talent and invest in advancement of Black leaders and focus our recruitment efforts on regional Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

We’ve donated $100,000 to Black-led organizations working for systemic change nationally and in our community of Durham, NC.

  • NAACP Legal Defense Fund
  • Village of Wisdom
  • Communities in Partnership
  • Spirithouse

We’re are increasing the Burt’s Bees Foundation’s commitment to supporting BIPOC-led organizations, while working with all grantees to bring an equity and justice lens to their work.

We’re sponsoring and participating in the Diversity and Equity in Environmental Programs (DEEP) Collaborative, a four-part online workshop series. Several Burt’s Bees leaders will join with environmental NGOs, government and other community leaders to incorporate a focus on racial equity and environmental justice into their work.

We will amplify BIPOC voices and share inclusive perspectives through our content, with continued focus on diverse representation among talent, content creators, and experts featured in our marketing programs.

Our workplace diversity is reported as part of our parent company’s Annual Report. We’re committed to transparency and progress in our inclusion and diversity journey. Here’s a look at our current U.S. demographic representation data.*

Our Parent Company’s Comittments

Diversity and inclusion are embraced at The Clorox Company, and are recognized as a business advantage. As a people-centered company, we’re creating a place where every member of our team can bring their best self to work every day.

As a public commitment that reflects this, in 2018, we signed the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion pledge, which was followed by a Day of Understanding where employees engaged in open dialogue about the issues we face. Our Employee Resource Groups are dedicated to advancing the diverse perspectives of employees and their allies through cultural events, panel discussions and business forums.

Today, our 13-member board has five female members and four minority members. Our independent lead director Pamela Thomas-Graham is Black and has been a director since 2005; she has been independent lead director since 2016. Among Fortune 500 companies, only about 1% have a Black woman as their independent lead director. Seven of our 12 executive leaders are female or minority, including our CEO Linda Rendle.

Within our workforce, underrepresented minorities represent 34% of our nonproduction employees (vs. 33% U.S. Census Bureau) and 30% of our nonproduction managers in the US (vs. 30% U.S. Census Bureau). We’ve set goals on pay equality and inclusion and diversity targets for our employees.

Clorox was named one of America’s best employers for diversity in 2020 by Forbes magazine. We proudly partner with over 10 organizations supporting greater diversity across our functions as part of our recruitment and workplace development efforts.

The company is expanding its commitments to drive lasting impact in our organization and beyond.

  • Every executive team member will volunteer with organizations that fight for equality and justice
  • We will increase our spending with minority- and women-owned businesses
  • We are doubling our investment to address conscious and unconscious bias
  • We will materially increase our recruiting focus on marginalized communities
  • Clorox has donated more than $3.1 million to organizations that support Black-owned businesses, Black youth and racial justice.

Clorox has donated more than $3.1 million to organizations that support Black-owned businesses, Black youth and racial justice.

Clorox has deep roots in Oakland and Atlanta. For years, we’ve focused on supporting cultural arts, K-12 education, STEM, literacy and leadership programs and urban farming. We are doing more, starting right now, to make an immediate and lasting impact for Black people in their communities, including an initial donation of $2.5 million focusing on three areas:

  • Supporting Black businesses in their communities impacted by recent events
  • Engaging Black youth who represent our future
  • Accelerating Black community access to justice and criminal justice reform

This investment will build on our long-standing support for marginalized communities, including the East Oakland Youth Development Center (EOYDC), which Clorox helped found in 1978. Employee resource groups will decide how to deploy some of this donation toward efforts fighting racism, injustice and inequality.